Spanish Rolls

Spanish Rolls

My favorite Spanish Bread. Soft, fluffy, filled with butter and sugar then rolled in breadcrumbs. Make it at home and eat it warm fresh out of the oven.

Soft, fluffy Spanish Bread filled with butter and sugar then laid in breadcrumbs. A bread like no other and definitely every Filipinos favorite merienda.

Spanish bread was the bread of my childhood in the Philippines. My siblings and I call it ‘potpot’ bread.

Every afternoon, we await the loud horn sound of the bread vendor. He goes around the neighborhood carrying a huge basket of warm and freshly baked Spanish bread at the back of his bicycle. It was so good! I still wish I had a chance to ask for his secret recipe. Alas, I was busy with play and friends back then. I just eat and never cared to cook nor bake. Hahaha…

The recipe we’re making today is not from the bread vendor. It is, however, the recipe I’ve been using for years. I’ve worked on this for a long time and I’m finally excited to share it with all of you bread lovers out there!

 

Filipino Spanish Bread Ingredients

  • Bread flour and All-purpose flour: Mixing these two kinds of flour allows us to control the protein content of the bread. Which just means that it will give the bread a soft and delicately chewy texture.
  • Egg yolks: No egg whites. This is the secret to a really soft and fluffy dough.
  • Pure unsalted butter: I love using butter when making bread. It makes my kitchen smell so good!
  • Sugar: We Filipinos love our buns sweet. We need this for the dough and for the butter filling.
  • Milk and Water: These will serve as the base liquid for the dough. The water is combined with the yeast to activate.
  • Active Dry Yeast or Instant Dry Yeast: Both can be used interchangeably. Activate in lukewarm water until foamy.
  • Bread crumbs: You can use Plain bread crumbs or Panko. If you are using the former, place it in a thick plastic bag and pound it to make it finer.

 

Bread making tips for beginners

  • Make sure the water is lukewarm before putting in the yeast. If it’s too hot the yeast will die. If it’s cold, it will not activate. To make sure that the water is at the right temperature, use a kitchen thermometer. The water should be between 30c/86f to 40c/104f.
  • Add a teaspoon of sugar to the water before stirring in the yeast. This will help easily activate it.
  • Activate the yeast in a bowl even if it’s instant yeast. This ensures that the yeast is fresh and alive.
  • Do not let the dough rise for too long if proving in a warm place. The maximum should be at least 1 hour. Otherwise, the bread will end up having a yeasty taste. The trick is (according to professional bakers) is to let it rise until it doubles in size and volume.
  • Knead dough until smooth and elastic, it should spring back when poked. Add more flour only when the dough is too wet and clings heavily to the sides of the bowl.

 

Spanish Bread recipe notes

Can I substitute bread flour with all-purpose flour?

Yes, you can substitute with all-purpose flour if bread flour is not available.  Replaced in the same amount as mentioned in the recipe. Bread will just be less chewy with all-purpose flour. 

How can I prove the dough during colder months?

For colder months, I use the oven to prove the dough. Place a glass baking dish on the bottom rack of the oven and fill it with boiling water. Put the dough in the middle or top rack and shut the door. The steam and heat from the boiling water will create a warm environment to help raise the dough.

Make-ahead tips

  • Make the dough ahead of time then place it in the fridge. The dough will slowly rise and double in size overnight. On the day of baking, remove from the refrigerator 30-40 mins before you’re going to shape them into rolls.
  • Another option is to make the dough and finish the first rise on the same day. Shape them into rolls then do the second or final rise in the fridge. Bake them the next day and you’re done! Bake them the next day and you’re done! Note: Once the shaped dough rolls have proved, you can’t remove or touch it in the pan. Otherwise, it will lose its shape.

Storage and re-heating

  • Store in an air-tight container in the fridge. Spanish bread is best eaten within 2 to 3 days.
  • Re-heat in a mini-oven toaster for 1 to 2 minutes over low heat.

I love having this with Chicken Sopas. How about you?

 

Prep Time: 1 hour                  Cook Time:  18 minutes

 

Equipment

  • Stand Mixer
  • Kitchen Scale
  • Parchment Paper
 

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 teaspoon yeast (mixed with 1 teaspoon sugar)
  • 1/2 cup water (lukewarm)
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour (i used wholemeal flour)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup fresh milk (lukewarm, evap can also be use)
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup butter (softened)
  • oil for the bowl

Butter Filling

  • 1/2 cup / 113.4g butter (softened)
  • 3/4 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 3 teaspoon milk

Breading

  • 1/4 cup breadcrumbs
  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar (optional)
 

Instructions

For the Dough

  • In a medium-size bowl, combine lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon of sugar, and yeast. Stir until completely dissolved. Let it stand for 5 to 10mins until yeast begins to foam.
  • Meanwhile, in the bowl of your stand mixer, combine flour, sugar, and salt. Mix thoroughly.
  • Add warm milk, yeast mixture, egg yolks, and butter to the dry ingredients. Stir until just combined. Attach the dough hook and turn the mixer on to the lowest speed and mix until flour is incorporated, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.
  • Increase the speed to medium and beat for 2 minutes. Add additional flour as necessary, start with 2 tablespoons and go from there. Continue beating for 5 to 6 minutes until the dough is slightly sticky and elastic, and pulling away from the edge of the bowl. Be careful not to add too much flour.

Rise # 1 Warm rise or cold rise

  • Wipe or spray oil on the sides of the bowl then form dough into a ball. Cover with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm spot for 1 hour until it doubles in size. To make ahead, do a cold rise by placing the dough in the refrigerator. The dough will slowly double in size the next day. See the notes for more information.

Spanish Bread Filling

  • Combine all the ingredients of the filling in a small bowl. Make this just before the dough finishes rising.

Rise #2 Shape the rolls

  • Remove the plastic wrap and punch the dough down. Transfer onto a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 20 to 24 portions. (see video). For an evenly sized dough, use a kitchen scale. Mine was about 50g each. Adjust based on your preference.
  • Using a rolling pin, flatten each portion into an oval shape. Spread 1 tablespoon of the filling, then roll it into a log (see video). Lay it in the bread crumbs. Shake off excess then place inside the baking tray greased or lined with a parchment paper. Repeat with all the other portions. Make sure that the dough is arranged two inches apart. Cover with a towel or cloth and let it rise for 40mins to 1 hour.

Baking

  • Preheat oven at 180c/356f, 15 minutes before the dough rolls finishes rising. Bake the Spanish bread for 18 to 20 minutes until the top turns light brown.

 Recipe Notes and Tips:

  • Bread flour – substitute with all-purpose flour if bread flour is not available.  Replaced in the same amount as mentioned in the recipe. Bread will just be less chewy with all-purpose flour.
  • Proving dough in colder months: For colder months, I use the oven to prove the dough. Place a glass baking dish on the bottom rack of the oven and fill it with boiling water. Put the dough in the middle or top rack and shut the door. The steam and heat from the boiling water will create a warm environment to help raise the dough.
  • Spanish Bread Filling – double the recipe if you prefer a thicker filling.
  • Make-ahead: Make the dough ahead of time then place it in the fridge. The dough will slowly rise and double in size overnight. On the day of baking, remove from the refrigerator 30-40 mins before you’re going to shape them into rolls.
  • Baking tip: If you’re using two racks, switch the trays after 12 minutes so all the rolls will brown evenly. Applicable only to 60cm/23 ovens and aboveBake in two separate batches if using compact ovens.
  • Storage and re-heating: Store in an air-tight container. Re-heat in a mini-oven toaster for 1 to 2 minutes over low heat.
 
 
Course : Snack
Cuisine : Filipino
Keyword : filipino bread, spanish bread recipe

Spanish Rolls
Print Recipe
My favorite Spanish Bread. Soft, fluffy, filled with butter and sugar then rolled in breadcrumbs. Make it at home and eat it warm fresh out of the oven.
Prep Time
1 hour
Cook Time
18 minutes
Prep Time
1 hour
Cook Time
18 minutes
Spanish Rolls
Print Recipe
My favorite Spanish Bread. Soft, fluffy, filled with butter and sugar then rolled in breadcrumbs. Make it at home and eat it warm fresh out of the oven.
Prep Time
1 hour
Cook Time
18 minutes
Prep Time
1 hour
Cook Time
18 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
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Pork Adobo

Pork Adobo

    1. This is a recipe post for Filipino Pork Adobo. It is a dish composed of pork slices cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, and garlic. There are version wherein onions are also added. Adobo is a popular dish in the Philippines, along with Sinigang.

Adobo, in general, can be cooked using different kinds of protein. Chicken is the commonly used ingredient. Have you tried cooking Filipino Chicken Adobo yet? Our tried and tested recipe should be able to help you.

Filipino Pork Adobo vs. Mexican Adobo

The word Adobo was derived from the Spanish word “adobar”. It means to marinate. This can be in the form of a liquid marinade or to rub using a combination of powdered ingredient.

This version of Filipino Adobo suggests marinating the pork in soy sauce and crushed garlic. By preference, vinegar can also be added as a marinade ingredient.

Mexican adobo, on the other hand, makes use of chillies, garlic, cinnamon, and oregano as marinade.

Both dishes look and taste different. It will be unfair to compare which among the two dishes are best because each of us has our own preference when it comes to flavor.

Filipino Pork Adobo Versions

The Philippines is composed of composed of many islands. It was initially estimated to be around 7,107. At present, the count rose to 7,641. Each of these islands belong to a cluster, which are divided into regions.

Pork Adobo

Almost every region in the Philippines have their own pork adobo version. Sometimes, there can be more than one version in a location.

The Basic Pork Adobo version is what you see in the recipe below. There are also similar versions with additional ingredients.

Pork and Chicken Adobo is perhaps one of the favorite when it comes to family picnics. This is a dish wherein pork and chicken slices are combined and cooked inadobo style. It can be done the same way as this recipe, with or without onions. This is our clans signature summer dish in the Philippines. I remember my tito’s and tita’s prepare a large portion every summer outing. We would go to Pansol in Laguna to rent a swimming pool for the clan and they would bring with them two large cauldrons (kaldero). One has the adobo in it, while the other is for the rice.

Pork Adobo with Potato is another version that I tried. This is a saucier pork adobo version with cubes of potatoes in it. I’m not sure where this dish originated. It might have been initially created as a filler to feed more people. Nevertheless, I liked the taste. I think that it can be improved by pan-frying the potato first. Most of the flavors gets absorbed by the potato. It can be a carbohydrate overload when you eat the potato with rice. This is a good dish to have when before going to the gym or before starting a marathon.

I cook Pork Adobo with Eggs all the time. This is my favorite. There are two ways to make it. Both ways require boiling the eggs beforehand.  The first version is cooked by adding boiled eggs once the pork gets tender. The eggs absorb the soy sauce, thus becomes darker in color. Be cautious about the time when cooking this way. We don’t want to overcook the eggs.

How can we tell if an egg is overcooked? It is simple. Egg yolk contain iron. When eggs are cooked longer than the usual, the iron turns greenish. This color formation happens between the yolk and egg white. We often refer to this as rings. Slice the boiled egg in half and try to examine the color of the outer yolk. When you see a dark ring around it, that means the egg is overcooked.

The other version of the adobo with egg is easier and does not put the eggs at risk of overcooking (unless it was overcooked during the boiling process). Simply add boiled eggs on the serving plate before serving. The eggs also retains its white color.

Pork Adobo with Tofu is a protein-rich adobo version. This is perfect for people who like their adobo mild in flavor. This version requires fried tofu. Always use extra firm tofu when making this. You can purchase raw tofu and fry it, or you can get packaged fried tofu from the supermarket.

The tofu absorbs most of the sauce in the process which tones down the flavor a bit. This is a good dish to prepare when you are into body building or into a protein-rich diet. Make sure to use lean cuts of pork though.

A favorite among our group of friends who like to drink beer is Spicy Pork Adobo. This is the perfect pulutan as far as I am concerned. The spicier it gets, the better it becomes. I tried making this dish using the former spiciest chili pepper in the world, Bhut Jolokia (It lost its crown to the Carolina Reaper, which is way spicier).  The result was a very delicious and extremely spicy adobo. The spice lingers in the mouth for a while. Be forewarned.

Adobong Baboy sa Gata is a classic. This is notorious for making people on limited-rice-diet crave for more rice. It is very rich, tasty, and delicious. Add a few pieces of Thai chili pepper, and you will not get enough of it.

How to Cook Pork Adobo

Pork Adobo Recipe

This version suggests marinating the pork to make it more flavorful. Pork belly and other fatty cuts of pork are ideal for this recipe.

The first thing to do is marinate the pork belly in soy sauce and crushed garlic. It is best to marinate it overnight. If time is limited, one hour should be enough. Some like to add vinegar during the process. You may do so if preferred.

Drain the marinade. Save it for later. The marinated pork needs to be browned. Heat a cooking pot. Add pork with garlic. You can also add a few tablespoons of cooking oil. Cook the pork until it turns brown.

The pork needs to be cooked until tender. Do this by pouring the remaining marinade, if any. Also add water. Let the liquid boil. This is the part where I put the whole peppercorn and dried bay leaves. These ingredients complete my pork adobo. Boiling for 40 minutes should be enough to tenderize the pork. There are times when you have to cook longer.

If you have not added the vinegar as part of the marinade, pour it into the pot and let it cook for 10 minutes. Salt is an optional ingredient for this recipe. Use it only if you think its needed.

Pork Adobo Alterative and Additional Ingredients

Pork – Use any cut of pork that you prefer. I suggest pork belly for best results. However, use leaner parts if you are trying to avoid fats. Pork tenderloin is a healthier choice. This is very tender and contains way less fat than pork belly. You can also use other proteins such as chicken and goat meat using this recipe.

Onion – This recipe does not suggest the use of onion. I think that onions help improve the taste of adobo. Use red, yellow, or white onion for this recipe. Make sure to chop it into small pieces.

Dried Bay Leaves – this is an ingredient that you can almost always find most of the time in the spice section of your local supermarket. Believe it or not, but this makes a huge difference when cooking adobo.

Whole Peppercorn – this is a traditional ingredient. It will not matter if you use crushed peppercorn or ground black pepper. Sichuan peppercorns are also good alternatives.

Sugar – adding a teaspoon of sugar will move your pork adobo on the sweeter side. I personally love the taste of adobo with a bit of sugar.

 

Pork Adobo Recipe

Basic Filipino Prok Adobo with Soy Sauce, Vinegar, and Garlic. This delicious dish is perfect when served over newly cooked white rice.
 CourseMain Course
 CuisineFilipino
 Prep Time10 minutes
 Cook Time1 hour
 Total Time1 hour 10 minutes
 Servings
 Calories1211kcal
 AuthorVanjo Merano

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs pork belly
  • 2 tablespoons garlic minced or crushed
  • 5 pieces dried bay leaves
  • 4 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon peppercorn
  • 2 cups water
  • Salt to taste

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Instructions

  • Combine the pork belly, soy sauce, and garlic then marinate for at least 1 hour
  • Heat the pot and put-in the marinated pork belly then cook for a few minutes
  • Pour remaining marinade including garlic.
  • Add water, whole pepper corn, and dried bay leaves then bring to a boil. Simmer for 40 minutes to 1 hour
  • Put-in the vinegar and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve hot. Share and enjoy!

Watch How to Cook Pork Adobo

Nutrition

Serving: 4g | Calories: 1211kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 120g | Saturated Fat: 43g | Cholesterol: 163mg | Sodium: 1700mg | Potassium: 530mg | Fiber: 1g | Vitamin A: 115IU | Vitamin C: 2.5mg | Calcium: 50mg | Iron: 2.7mg
Pork Adobo
Print Recipe
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Pork Adobo
Print Recipe
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Combine the pork belly, soy sauce, and garlic then marinate for at least 1 hour
  2. Heat the pot and put-in the marinated pork belly then cook for a few minutes
  3. Pour remaining marinade including garlic. Add water, whole pepper corn, and dried bay leaves then bring to a boil.
  4. Simmer for 40 minutes to 1 hour
  5. Put-in the vinegar and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes
  6. Add salt to taste Serve hot. Share and enjoy!
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Tri-Colored Mochi

Tri-Colored Mochi

A centuries old Japanese tradition is the eating of mochi on New Year.  It usually starts around the new year when Japanese households and communities take part in a traditional Mochitsuki the pounding of sweet rice to make the flour.  The flour is used to make mochi which can be a sweet or savory treat.

In Hawaii mochi is definitely served on New Year specially by families of Japanese ancestry.  I’ve been fortunate enough to be invited by friends whose families practice this tradition.  I’ve had mochi as dumplings in a fish based soup, not exactly my favorite; fried and served with soy sauce; and sweet chewy squares, my favorite.

Mochi is also always available in Hawaii.  It’s found in many local grocery stores and some bakeries.  But most of the time I make Mochi at home.  One of my favorites is Chi Chi Dango, it’s a sweet square made with coconut milk and is usually pink in color.  Another favorite is this Tri-Colored mochi, which is really just a layered Chi Chi Dango in 3 colors, green, pink, and white.  I don’t make it often simply because it’s tedious baking 3 layers, the single color version is just as good.  But Tri-Colored Mochi does look pretty when served at a party.

By the way Mochi is made from glutinous rice flour and is naturally gluten free and since it uses coconut milk it’s also dairy free! It’s the perfect treat for any one with gluten, dairy, and nut allergies.

You can buy both Mochi flour (one of the brand names is Mochiko), canned coconut milk, and Katakoriko at any Asian market.

Tri-Colored Mochi

Ingredients:

1 Box Mochiko flour (1 pound)

2 1/2 Cups Sugar

1 Tsp. Baking Powder

1 Can Coconut Milk

3/4 Cup Water

1 Tsp. Vanilla

2 – 3 drops each of red and green food color

Katakoriku (potato starch)

Directions:

Pre-heat Oven to 350 degrees.

Grease a 9 x 13 baking pan.

Mix all ingredients except the Katakoriku in a bowl until smooth.

Divide batter into 3 equal parts. (I pour them 1 measuring cups)

Color one part pink with red food color, and one part green with green food color, leave third part white.

Pour Green part into your pan and cover with foil.

Bake for 15 minutes and remove from oven.  Uncover and cool for 15 minutes.

Pour white batter over green layer and cover with foil.

Bake for 20 minutes and remove from oven.  Uncover and cool for 15 minutes.

Pour pink batter over white layer and cover with foil.

Bake for 30 minutes and remove from oven.

Uncover and cool for at least 30 minutes.

Cut into squares – I use a pizza wheel to cut even strips then cut those strips into small rectangles.

Place Katakoriku on a plate and roll each piece of mochi in it.  This will dust the mochi so that they don’t stick together.

Store in airtight containers on the counter.  It should last about 3 days, that is if you can keep from eating it sooner!

 

 

Tri-Colored Mochi
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Tri-Colored Mochi
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Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice

Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice

Chicken Long Rice is a staple at most Hawaiian Luaus where it is served as a side dish.  It’s a favorite island comfort food, something in between Chicken Noodle Soup and Chicken Stew, and usually eaten with steamed white rice.

Chicken long rice uses clear bean thread noodles.  Those are noodles made with mung bean starch and are thin and clear.  They’re also called Chinese Vermicelli, Cellophane Noodles, or Glass Noodles.  You can buy them at any Asian Market.

The dish is pretty much the same as its Filipino counterpart called Sotanghon.  Both originated in China and was brought over to the Hawaiian islands by Chinese and Filipino immigrants. Whatever its origins it’s one of my favorite go to comfort food.  Best of all it’s super simple to make.  It’s great on chilly or rainy days and wonderful when you have a slight cold.  Try it out next time you’ve a yen for Chicken Soup!

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Chicken Long Rice

Ingredients:

5-6 Chicken thighs with bone and skin

Water

1 Tbs. Oil

1 Tbs. Fresh grated ginger root

1 Tbs. minced garlic

1 Cup Chicken Stock

1 Tsp. Salt

2 Tbs. Soy Sauce

1 Package Bean Thread Noodles

1/4 Cup chopped green onions

2 cloves garlic thinly sliced (optional)

1/2 Tbs. Oil (optional)

Directions:

Heat oil in a stock pot.

Saute garlic and chicken thighs until thighs start to turn yellow.

Add enough water in the pot to cover the chicken with water.

Add chicken stock, ginger, and salt.

Simmer until chicken is very well cooked and falling off the bone.

Remove chicken skin and bones.  Discard skin and bone.  Shred chicken meat into large pieces and return to pot.

Add noodles, soy sauce, and 3/4 of the chopped green onions.

Stir and cook until noodles are soft and transparent.

*Optional – fry garlic slices in 1/2 tbs. oil until they turn brown.  Drain on paper towels.

Remove from heat and garnish with remaining with remaining green onion. Garnish with fried garlic.

 

 

 


Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice
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Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice
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Tendon – Shrimp Tempura Rice Bowl

Tendon – Shrimp Tempura Rice Bowl

 

Rice Bowls have gotten very popular and come in endless types.  But I’ve loved rice bowls long before they became all the rage.  If you’re not familiar with rice bowls they’re basically a bowl of rice topped with pretty much anything you want.  My favorite ones are Japanese Donburis.

Donburi is a rice bowl dish served in a bowl which in Japan are also called “donburi”.  There are many different types of Donburi but the most popular ones are Tempura Donburi or better known as Tendon if it’s made with shrimp, Chicken or Pork Katsu Donburi also called Katsudon.  You’ll also find Tempura Donburi with fish and vegetable tempuras, Teriyaki, and other types of popular Japanese dishes. Another basic ingredient of most Donburi dishes is egg meaning veggies and other ingredients are scrambled with eggs and a donburi sauce which is then placed on a bed of rice and topped with a desired tempura, katsu, or a preferred protein including teriyaki beef or chicken.

My long time favorite is Tendon or Shrimp Tempura Donburi.  I’ve been enjoying this rice bowl since I first discovered it while I was in high school.  I also like the Katsudon!

I’ve always been able to get my Tendon from most Japanese restaurants in my area, and since I live in Hawaii my neighborhood grocery store.  But when the pandemic locked us down for a month I decided to try and make it at home, after all it’s just shrimp tempura, eggs, Kamaboko (fish cake) and veggies over a bed of rice.  How hard could that be?

Making Tendon is actually pretty easy but it does require making Shrimp Tempura.  Since I must make the tempura batter for the shrimp I also make vegetable tempura with zucchini, green beans, and pretty much what I have on hand.

Another important part of this or any Donburi is the sauce.  The sauce is made with Mirin (a Japanese rice wine used for cooking), soy sauce, dashi (fish stock) and sugar.  This give the dish it’s sweet salty taste that make it delicious!  You can find all the ingredients at an Asian market.  The Dashi usually is in powder form like boullion so you’ll have to mix it as directed to get the liquid stock.

Of course the “star” of this dish is the Shrimp Tempura.  You can either use a tempura mix also found at the Asian market, or you can make your own batter.  Either way the most important things to remember to make perfect tempura batter is to use ice cold water and to not over stir the batter, it needs to have some lumps in it.  In fact the best way to stir this batter is with chopsticks, so leave your whisk or electric mixers out of it.

So here’s the recipe for both Shrimp Tempura (it’s the same batter for fish or vegetable tempura) and the Donburi itself.  This recipe makes 2 bowls.

Tendon

Ingredients for the Tempura

1 Cup Flour, shifted

1 Egg

1 Cup water

Ice cubes for chilling water

4 Large Shrimp – shelled and deveined but leave the tail on, pat dry with paper towel

Cut vegetables – zucchini, green beans, etc. (optional)

1/8 Cup flour

Oil for frying

Ingredients for Sauce:

6 Tbs. Mirin

2 Tbs. Soy Sauce

3 Tbs. Liquid Dashi – mix Dashi powder as directed on the box

2 Tbs. Sugar

Ingredients for Donburi:

2 Eggs, beaten

1/2 Onion, sliced

1/2 Cup Shitake Mushrooms (optional)

1/2 Kamaboko, cut into thin strips (optional)

1/3 Cup Green Onions, chopped (optional)

1 Tbs. Oil

Donburi Sauce

2 Cups Cooked White Rice

Seaweed flakes (optional)

Directions to make Tempura:

Place about 2″ of oil in a pot and start to heat while you prepare the batter.

Place shifted flower in a bowl and set aside.

In another bowl slightly beat egg – beat until yolk and white is just combined.

Add ice to water until the water is chilled.

Remove ice and pour water in the bowl with the beaten egg.

Mix gently together.

Stir in flour, do not over mix there should be lumps in the batter.  Use right away, if for some reason you can’t use it immediately place in the refrigerator for a few minutes until you’re ready to fry.

Place 1/8 cup of flour in a dish.

Test the oil temperature by dropping a small bit of batter in oil, if oil bubbles around the batter the oil is ready.

Roll shrimp or vegetable in the dish of flour, shake off excess.

Dip in batter, let excess batter drip off before adding into hot oil.

Place battered shrimp and veggies in hot oil to fry.  Do not over crowd the pot, cook in batches if you have to.

Turn as needed to cook all sides. Tempura is done when the shrimp or vegetable starts to float.

Drain on rack and set aside.

Directions for the sauce:

Mix all sauce ingredients together in a small bowl and set aside until needed.

Directions for the Donburi:

Heat oil in a skillet.

Saute onions in skillet until it starts to go limp and clear

Add in Kamoboko, mushrooms, and green onions (reserve some as garnish if desired)

Cook about 3-4 minutes.

Add in Donburi Sauce and simmer for 1 minute.

Pour beaten egg over all and cook until egg is done.

Place 1 Cup of rice in each bowl.

Cute the Egg mixture in half and place a half over each bowl of rice.

Top with Shrimp and Vegetable (if you made some) Tempura and garnish with green onions and seaweed flakes

Serve hot!

 

Tendon - Shrimp Tempura Rice Bowl
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Servings
2 Bowls
Servings
2 Bowls
Tendon - Shrimp Tempura Rice Bowl
Print Recipe
Servings
2 Bowls
Servings
2 Bowls
Ingredients
Shrimp & Veggie Tempura
Sauce
Donburi
Servings: Bowls
Instructions
Tempura
  1. Place shifted flower in a bowl and set aside.
  2. In another bowl slightly beat egg - beat until yolk and white is just combined.
  3. Add ice to water until the water is chilled.
  4. Remove ice and pour water in the bowl with the beaten egg. Mix gently together.
  5. Stir in flour, do not over mix there should be lumps in the batter.  Use right away, if for some reason you can't use it immediately place in the refrigerator for a few minutes until you're ready to fry.
  6. Place 1/8 cup of flour in a dish.
  7. Test the oil temperature by dropping a small bit of batter in oil, if oil bubbles around the batter the oil is ready.
  8. Roll shrimp or vegetable in the dish of flour, shake off excess.
  9. Dip in batter, let excess batter drip off before adding into hot oil. Place battered shrimp and veggies in hot oil to fry.  Do not over crowd the pot, cook in batches if you have to.
  10. Turn as needed to cook all sides. Tempura is done when the shrimp or vegetable starts to float. Drain on rack and set aside.
Sauce
  1. Mix all ingredients together and set aside until needed
Donburi
  1. Heat oil in a skillet.
  2. Saute onions in skillet until it starts to go limp and clear
  3. Add in Kamoboko, mushrooms, and green onions (reserve some as garnish if desired) Cook about 3-4 minutes.
  4. Add in Donburi Sauce and simmer for 1 minute.
  5. Pour beaten egg over all and cook until egg is done.
  6. Divide cooked egg mixture in half and place one half on top of each bowl of rice.
  7. Place 2 Shrimp Tempura & pieces of veggie tempura (if you made some) on top of egg.
  8. Garnish with green onions and seafood flakes if desired.
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