Pork Adobo

Pork Adobo

    1. This is a recipe post for Filipino Pork Adobo. It is a dish composed of pork slices cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, and garlic. There are version wherein onions are also added. Adobo is a popular dish in the Philippines, along with Sinigang.

Adobo, in general, can be cooked using different kinds of protein. Chicken is the commonly used ingredient. Have you tried cooking Filipino Chicken Adobo yet? Our tried and tested recipe should be able to help you.

Filipino Pork Adobo vs. Mexican Adobo

The word Adobo was derived from the Spanish word “adobar”. It means to marinate. This can be in the form of a liquid marinade or to rub using a combination of powdered ingredient.

This version of Filipino Adobo suggests marinating the pork in soy sauce and crushed garlic. By preference, vinegar can also be added as a marinade ingredient.

Mexican adobo, on the other hand, makes use of chillies, garlic, cinnamon, and oregano as marinade.

Both dishes look and taste different. It will be unfair to compare which among the two dishes are best because each of us has our own preference when it comes to flavor.

Filipino Pork Adobo Versions

The Philippines is composed of composed of many islands. It was initially estimated to be around 7,107. At present, the count rose to 7,641. Each of these islands belong to a cluster, which are divided into regions.

Pork Adobo

Almost every region in the Philippines have their own pork adobo version. Sometimes, there can be more than one version in a location.

The Basic Pork Adobo version is what you see in the recipe below. There are also similar versions with additional ingredients.

Pork and Chicken Adobo is perhaps one of the favorite when it comes to family picnics. This is a dish wherein pork and chicken slices are combined and cooked inadobo style. It can be done the same way as this recipe, with or without onions. This is our clans signature summer dish in the Philippines. I remember my tito’s and tita’s prepare a large portion every summer outing. We would go to Pansol in Laguna to rent a swimming pool for the clan and they would bring with them two large cauldrons (kaldero). One has the adobo in it, while the other is for the rice.

Pork Adobo with Potato is another version that I tried. This is a saucier pork adobo version with cubes of potatoes in it. I’m not sure where this dish originated. It might have been initially created as a filler to feed more people. Nevertheless, I liked the taste. I think that it can be improved by pan-frying the potato first. Most of the flavors gets absorbed by the potato. It can be a carbohydrate overload when you eat the potato with rice. This is a good dish to have when before going to the gym or before starting a marathon.

I cook Pork Adobo with Eggs all the time. This is my favorite. There are two ways to make it. Both ways require boiling the eggs beforehand.  The first version is cooked by adding boiled eggs once the pork gets tender. The eggs absorb the soy sauce, thus becomes darker in color. Be cautious about the time when cooking this way. We don’t want to overcook the eggs.

How can we tell if an egg is overcooked? It is simple. Egg yolk contain iron. When eggs are cooked longer than the usual, the iron turns greenish. This color formation happens between the yolk and egg white. We often refer to this as rings. Slice the boiled egg in half and try to examine the color of the outer yolk. When you see a dark ring around it, that means the egg is overcooked.

The other version of the adobo with egg is easier and does not put the eggs at risk of overcooking (unless it was overcooked during the boiling process). Simply add boiled eggs on the serving plate before serving. The eggs also retains its white color.

Pork Adobo with Tofu is a protein-rich adobo version. This is perfect for people who like their adobo mild in flavor. This version requires fried tofu. Always use extra firm tofu when making this. You can purchase raw tofu and fry it, or you can get packaged fried tofu from the supermarket.

The tofu absorbs most of the sauce in the process which tones down the flavor a bit. This is a good dish to prepare when you are into body building or into a protein-rich diet. Make sure to use lean cuts of pork though.

A favorite among our group of friends who like to drink beer is Spicy Pork Adobo. This is the perfect pulutan as far as I am concerned. The spicier it gets, the better it becomes. I tried making this dish using the former spiciest chili pepper in the world, Bhut Jolokia (It lost its crown to the Carolina Reaper, which is way spicier).  The result was a very delicious and extremely spicy adobo. The spice lingers in the mouth for a while. Be forewarned.

Adobong Baboy sa Gata is a classic. This is notorious for making people on limited-rice-diet crave for more rice. It is very rich, tasty, and delicious. Add a few pieces of Thai chili pepper, and you will not get enough of it.

How to Cook Pork Adobo

Pork Adobo Recipe

This version suggests marinating the pork to make it more flavorful. Pork belly and other fatty cuts of pork are ideal for this recipe.

The first thing to do is marinate the pork belly in soy sauce and crushed garlic. It is best to marinate it overnight. If time is limited, one hour should be enough. Some like to add vinegar during the process. You may do so if preferred.

Drain the marinade. Save it for later. The marinated pork needs to be browned. Heat a cooking pot. Add pork with garlic. You can also add a few tablespoons of cooking oil. Cook the pork until it turns brown.

The pork needs to be cooked until tender. Do this by pouring the remaining marinade, if any. Also add water. Let the liquid boil. This is the part where I put the whole peppercorn and dried bay leaves. These ingredients complete my pork adobo. Boiling for 40 minutes should be enough to tenderize the pork. There are times when you have to cook longer.

If you have not added the vinegar as part of the marinade, pour it into the pot and let it cook for 10 minutes. Salt is an optional ingredient for this recipe. Use it only if you think its needed.

Pork Adobo Alterative and Additional Ingredients

Pork – Use any cut of pork that you prefer. I suggest pork belly for best results. However, use leaner parts if you are trying to avoid fats. Pork tenderloin is a healthier choice. This is very tender and contains way less fat than pork belly. You can also use other proteins such as chicken and goat meat using this recipe.

Onion – This recipe does not suggest the use of onion. I think that onions help improve the taste of adobo. Use red, yellow, or white onion for this recipe. Make sure to chop it into small pieces.

Dried Bay Leaves – this is an ingredient that you can almost always find most of the time in the spice section of your local supermarket. Believe it or not, but this makes a huge difference when cooking adobo.

Whole Peppercorn – this is a traditional ingredient. It will not matter if you use crushed peppercorn or ground black pepper. Sichuan peppercorns are also good alternatives.

Sugar – adding a teaspoon of sugar will move your pork adobo on the sweeter side. I personally love the taste of adobo with a bit of sugar.

 

Pork Adobo Recipe

Basic Filipino Prok Adobo with Soy Sauce, Vinegar, and Garlic. This delicious dish is perfect when served over newly cooked white rice.
 CourseMain Course
 CuisineFilipino
 Prep Time10 minutes
 Cook Time1 hour
 Total Time1 hour 10 minutes
 Servings
 Calories1211kcal
 AuthorVanjo Merano

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs pork belly
  • 2 tablespoons garlic minced or crushed
  • 5 pieces dried bay leaves
  • 4 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon peppercorn
  • 2 cups water
  • Salt to taste

ADVERTISEMENT

Instructions

  • Combine the pork belly, soy sauce, and garlic then marinate for at least 1 hour
  • Heat the pot and put-in the marinated pork belly then cook for a few minutes
  • Pour remaining marinade including garlic.
  • Add water, whole pepper corn, and dried bay leaves then bring to a boil. Simmer for 40 minutes to 1 hour
  • Put-in the vinegar and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve hot. Share and enjoy!

Watch How to Cook Pork Adobo

Nutrition

Serving: 4g | Calories: 1211kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 120g | Saturated Fat: 43g | Cholesterol: 163mg | Sodium: 1700mg | Potassium: 530mg | Fiber: 1g | Vitamin A: 115IU | Vitamin C: 2.5mg | Calcium: 50mg | Iron: 2.7mg
Pork Adobo
Print Recipe
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Pork Adobo
Print Recipe
Servings
4 people
Servings
4 people
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. Combine the pork belly, soy sauce, and garlic then marinate for at least 1 hour
  2. Heat the pot and put-in the marinated pork belly then cook for a few minutes
  3. Pour remaining marinade including garlic. Add water, whole pepper corn, and dried bay leaves then bring to a boil.
  4. Simmer for 40 minutes to 1 hour
  5. Put-in the vinegar and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes
  6. Add salt to taste Serve hot. Share and enjoy!
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds)

Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds)

Chicharon

Chicharon (Chicharrón) is a delicious pork  finger food popular in the Philippines, Spain, and throughout Latin America.

Pork Cracklings or Chicharon are crispy fried pork skins, often served as an appetizer with a spicy vinegar dipping sauce. It is also served as Pulutan or snack when drinking liquor.  It can be crushed and used as a topping for many Filipino dishes such as Pancit Palabok and Arroz Caldo.

This is very easy to prepare and to cook. Today I will give you my version of Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds), you will love this.

If you’re looking for more merienda recipes check out our Merienda Series  including “Halo-Halo ” Filipino Iced Mixed Fruit DessertHalayang Ube (Purple Yam Jam)Banana Lumpia – TuronBibingka GalapongPuto Cheese (Steamed Rice Cake with Cheese)Mais con Yelo – Refreshing Filipino SnackBananas in Syrup – Minatamis na Sabang SagingBanana Que – Fried Banana SkewersPancit Palabok – Filipino Noodle DishBiko (Sweet Rice Cake) TreatFilipino Beef Empanada Recipe Champorado: Filipino Chocolate Rice PorridgePalitaw – Coconut & Sesame Seed Topped Sticky Rice Dumplings and Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds) Recipe!

 

Ingredients:

1 large pork rinds or skin  (balat ng baboy), fat trimmed

1 tsp. peppercorn

4 cloves garlic

1 large onion, quartered

1 tbsp. salt

5-7 cups cooking oil

5-7 cups water to fully cover rinds

 

Directions:

Simmer the pork rinds in water seasoned with garlic, onion, salt and peppercorns. Cook until tender, about 30-50 minutes.

Cut the rinds into 1 1/2″ squares.

Bake in a 200°F; for about an hour up to one hour and a half or until the rinds are thoroughly dry.

Remove from oven and set aside to cool down, or refrigerate to fry at another time.

To fry, heat up enough oil for deep frying, use medium to medium high heat or at 350°F;.

Fry until golden brown or 2-4 minutes and drain excess oil.

Sprinkle salt and pepper right away.

Serve with a white vinegar dipping sauce with chopped onion and garlic.

 

Share and Enjoy!


468x60 GMC Monthly Clubs

Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds) Recipe
Print Recipe
Chicharon (Crispy Pork Rinds) Recipe
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Simmer the pork rinds in water seasoned with garlic, onion, salt and peppercorns. Cook until tender, about 30-50 minutes.
  2. Cut the rinds into 1 1/2″ squares.
  3. Bake in a 200°F; for about an hour up to one hour and a half or until the rinds are thoroughly dry.
  4. Remove from oven and set aside to cool down, or refrigerate to fry at another time.
  5. To fry, heat up enough oil for deep frying, use medium to medium high heat or at 350°F;.
  6. Fry until golden brown or 2-4 minutes and drain excess oil.
  7. Sprinkle salt and pepper right away.
  8. Serve with Simple vinegar dipping sauce with chopped onion and garlic.
  9. Share and Enjoy!
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe
Bulalo or Pochero Recipe (Filipino Beef Marrow Stew)

Bulalo or Pochero Recipe (Filipino Beef Marrow Stew)

Bulalo or Pochero Recipe (Filipino Beef Marrow Stew)

 

Pochero is a type of stew  originally from Spain.  It comes from the Spanish word “puchero” which means “stewpot”.

The dish is similar to the cocido of Spain with colorants such as paprika.  It uses local ingredients which vary from one region to another.  In Spain chickpeas are widely used.

In the Philippines, like in most other countries, every region has its own type of cuisine.    Pochero is the Cebuano version of Tagalog Bulalo which is one of the most popular stews in the country.  It’s basically the same thing with a couple of different local ingredients.

When I was on vacation in the Queen City of the South “Cebu City” Philippines  we went out  for dinner  somewhere in  F. Ramos Street, Ramos.  My mother ordered their specialty called “Pochero” or Cebu Style Bulalo.  It smelled so good and tasted so delicious, but it was so expensive.  I thought why not make it at home?

I researched the recipe and thanks to Overseas Pinoy Cooking I was able to make it.   My family and neighbors loved it.  I saved money and dinner was yummy!  Here’s the recipe!

Ingredients:

1 to 1.5 kilo bulalo, beef shank, in one piece

2 bundles pechay, trimmed

1/2 medium size cabbage, cut into wedges

4 young sweet corn in cob, cut in halves

1/4 kilo sliced bamboo shoot, pre-boiled

1 whole garlic

1 tbsp peppercorn

2 medium size whole onion

2 medium size onion, quartered

1 bundle chives or spring onion, cut in 2” length

salt to taste

 

Directions:

Place the whole beef shank in a large casserole.

Cover with water.

Add the whole onion, garlic and peppercorns.

Bring to a boil, remove scum that rises.

Lower heat, cover and simmer/slow cook for 3-4 hours or until the beef tendons are tender.

Remove the now tender beef shank from the casserole and keep aside.

Place the remaining broth in a big bowl, set aside.

Wash the casserole of all scum, using a sieve strain the broth and replace in the same casserole, add more water as necessary.

Add in the bamboo shoot and sweet corn, bring to a boil and simmer for 5-10 minutes or until the sweet corn are cooked.

Season with salt to taste.

Add in the beef shank, cabbage and pechay, cook for another 2-3 minutes or until vegetables are just cook, garnish with chives or spring onion.

Transfer in a big serving bowl and serve at once with a dipping sauce of patis, kalamansi and siling labuyo.

 

 

 

 

Bulalo
Bulalo or Pochero Recipe (Filipino Beef Marrow Stew)
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
8 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
4 1/2 Hours 3 - 4 Hours
Servings Prep Time
8 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
4 1/2 Hours 3 - 4 Hours
Bulalo
Bulalo or Pochero Recipe (Filipino Beef Marrow Stew)
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
8 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
4 1/2 Hours 3 - 4 Hours
Servings Prep Time
8 Servings 30 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
4 1/2 Hours 3 - 4 Hours
Ingredients
Servings: Servings
Instructions
  1. Place the whole beef shank in a large casserole.
  2. Cover with water.
  3. Add the whole onion, garlic and peppercorns.
  4. Bring to a boil, remove scum that rises.
  5. Lower heat, cover and simmer/slow cook for 3-4 hours or until the beef tendons are tender.
  6. Remove the now tender beef shank from the casserole and keep aside.
  7. Place the remaining broth in a big bowl, set aside.
  8. Wash the casserole of all scum, using a sieve strain the broth and replace in the same casserole, add more water as necessary.
  9. Add in the bamboo shoot and sweet corn, bring to a boil and simmer for 5-10 minutes or until the sweet corn are cooked.
  10. Season with salt to taste.
  11. Add in the beef shank, cabbage and pechay, cook for another 2-3 minutes or until vegetables are just cook, garnish with chives or spring onion.
  12. Transfer in a big serving bowl and serve at once with a dipping sauce of patis (brine), kalamansi (Lemon Juice and siling labuyo (chili pepper)
Share this Recipe
Powered byWP Ultimate Recipe