Nature Art Activities for Kids

Nature Art Activities for Kids

Savvy Nana – The Nature Art Activities for Kids

Kids can get creative outside with dirt, sand, sticks and stones

By: Andrea Mulder-Slater

When the weather outside is delightful, it’s no time to craft inside.

Instead, invite (or shove) your kids out the door and encourage them to get creative with natural – readily available – materials.

Here are five ideas to get you (and them) started.

STICK SCULPTURE

Sticks, fallen leaves, wildflowers, stones, grass and the odd found object (in our case, a scrap piece of wood left over from a construction project), can be combined to make fabulous temporary sculptures on the lawn.

Make a sculpture using natural materials - Nature Art Activities for Kids Make a sculpture using natural materials - Nature Art Activities for Kids Make a sculpture using natural materials - Nature Art Activities for Kids Make a sculpture using natural materials - Nature Art Activities for Kids Make a sculpture from natural materials.

SAND MOSAICS

All you need to make these cool creations is a cookie tray, some sand and a few found objects like seashells, pebbles, and dried beans and lentils. The beauty of these mosaics is – because they are temporary – kids can make them over and over (and over) again.

 Sand mosaics craft for kids. Sand mosaics craft for kids - Nature Art Activities for Kids

ROCK ART

Making sculptures out of rocks is all about balance. Simply grab some rocks, stones and pebbles and see what develops.

Rock sculptures by Jantje.  Rock art sculpture

STONE DRAWING

Left to their own devices, kids will sooner or later figure out that rocks can make marks on other rocks. Encourage them to experiment to see which stones create the best colours.

Drawing on rocks, with other rocks.

DIRT PAINTING

You don’t need a lot of supplies to paint with dirt (just add water), but if your kids are looking for something a little more colourful, you can add a little bit of water-based paint or food colouring into the mix.
Paint with mud and tempera.
Paint with mud and tempera.   Paint with mud and tempera.

Paint with mud and tempera - Nature Art Activities for Kids

Ready, set… now get outside!

For more information on how https://www.savvynana.com can help you with Nature Art Activities for Kids, please contact us at 808-372-7734, or visit us here:

Savvy Nana

38 Oak Cove Lane Humble, Texas 77346

808-372-7734

DIY Crafts

Ten Transportation Activities for Kids

Ten Transportation Activities for Kids

With these ten activities, students will learn all about how people and products get from place to place.

By Andrea Mulder-Slater

With these ten activities, students will learn all about how people and products get from place to place.

This lesson idea that can be carried on through many sessions. The idea is to introduce and discuss different modes of transportation and in the end, create one or more transportation artifacts.

Vocabulary:

water, air, land, boats, cars, automobiles, ships, sailing, walking, movement, bicycle, sled, canoe, airplane, truck, schoolbus, skateboard, skates, airport, vehicles, driver, pilot, captain, traffic light, horn, windshield wipers, safety belts, steering wheel, trains, fuel, gas, tires, dump truck, pick-up truck, station-wagon, sports car, garage, tractors

Discussion/Field Trips:

Discuss different modes of transportation on land, sea and in the air. Talk about how people get to where they are going (school bus, ferry boat, car etc.) Incorporate field trips wherever possible. Take a trip on a school bus, walk around the school parking lot to look at cars, visit the airport, bus station or train station. Watch videos that show different forms of transportation. Look at travel magazines. Ask if anyone has been on a plane … a train … a horse … etc. Ask how students get to school everyday. How do kids in other countries travel? Leave lots of time for discussion. Make sure to review safety rules (seat belts in cars, obeying traffic signals, walk and don’t walk signs). Don’t forget to discuss how products are delivered … couriers with trucks, airplanes etc. How does the mail travel?

Activities:

BULLETIN BOARD ACTIVITY: Students can collect images of different types of transportation and add them to a bulletin board that has been divided into Land, Sea and Air.

TRANSPORTATION MURAL: Students can work together to create a transportation mural (one for land, one for sea and one for air).

SOUND PICTURES: What sounds do the various modes of transportation make? (train whistle, truck horn, police car siren) How would these sounds appear if we were to draw them? Provide crayons and paper for students to experiment with the colors and shapes of transportation sounds.

TOY CAR PRINTMAKING: Using old toy cars and tempera paint, allow students to dip the cars into paint and “drive” them across paper to see what kinds of marks the tires make.

LICENSE PLATE RUBBINGS: Using old license plates (or plate on cars in the parking lot) allow students to do rubbings of the plates. Provide paper and crayons for the rubbings.

SHAPE VEHICLES: See how many types of transportation vehicles can be created using the basic geometric shapes (triangles, squares, circles, rectangles). Have students cut their shapes out of construction paper and arrange them to create vehicles.

PAPER BOATS: Make paper boats using the directions found. Decorate them with bright crayon colors.

PAPER AIRPLANES: Make paper airplanes. Decorate them with bright crayon colors.

TRANSPORTATION MOBILE:

What You Need:
String or yarn; coat hangers; thick paper; paint; brushes; scissors; hole punch; markers or crayons

What You Do:
After discussing how people and products get from place to place, students can create drawings and paintings of various modes of transportation on thick paper. The pictures can be painted or decorated with markers or crayons. Once complete, the pictures can be cut out and put together in a mobile … by punching holes in the pictures and hanging them from a coat hanger that has been wrapped with yarn or raffia. **Have your students write facts on the back of each of their modes of transportation. (ie trucks deliver newspapers; people travel on airplanes etc.)

TAKE A TRIP ON A ZEBRA: Have students consider what life would be like without cars or trucks. What if we traveled by riding animals? Not just any animals: elephants, zebras, tigers, ducks etc. Students can draw or paint their ideas on paper.

For more information on how https://www.savvynana.com can help you with Ten Transportation Activities for Kids, please contact us at 808-372-7734, or visit us here:

Savvy Nana

38 Oak Cove Lane Humble, Texas 77346

808-372-7734

DIY Projects

Ten Transportation Activities for Kids

 

Spring Flamingo Birthday Party

Spring Flamingo Birthday Party

Looking for a fun and flirty party theme for your next big event?! Check out this completely darling Spring Flamingo Birthday Party

Its vibrant color combination,  festive sweets, and super cute stationery are sure to give you the inspiration needed to plan one fabulous fête; a fête that will most certainly have friends and family a flocking!

Here are the details included in this fabulous birthday celebration that I can’t seem to get enough of:

  • Spring Flamingo-inspired stationery + printables
  • Pineapple cake pops
  • Custom Flamingo and flower cupcake toppers
  • Paper fan arch backdrop
  • Colorful balloon bunches
  • Flamingo, pineapple and fern-shaped sugar cookies
  • Banana marshmallows
  • Hand-painted macarons
  • And more!

 

Sign from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (19)

Cake from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (6)

Cake Pops from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (7)

 

Doughnuts from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (8)

Drink Bottles from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (9)

Cookies from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (10)

Cupcakes from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (11)

Favors from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (12)

Cupcakes from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (13)

Flamingo-inspired Cupcakes from a Cupcakes from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (14)

Macarons from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (15)

Macarons + Sugar Cookies from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (16)

 

Cookies from a Spring Flamingo Birthday Party via Kara's Party Ideas - KarasPartyIdeas.com (18)

 

Spring Flamingo Party Details:

This is what Angie shared about the party- “Since Caitlin’s birthday is in April, we thought it is just fitting to have her 1st birthday with an array of Spring colors and flowers to make it vibrant and festive. And for an extra dose of fun, we added pink flamingos and pineapple and ferns to the mix!

We added custom made cute flamingo and flowers cupcake toppers as well as the pineapple shaped cake pops to reinforce the theme. On top of the flamingos lawn decoration flanking the birthday cake, and the cookies, we also had to spice up our macarons by hand painting it with flamingos and pineapples for an extra dose of cuteness. Glass bottles are dressed up in custom wrapper ready for the orange punch, while banana marshmallows adds just a zest of yellow to the table. The backdrop with the colorful combination of paper fans and honeycombs just brings everything alive! We are very thrilled with how this table came together.”

Goodbye Winter, Hello Spring Party Themes

Goodbye Winter, Hello Spring Party Themes

When the seasons change, so do the party themes and trends. As we move towards spring we are moving away from the earthy, rustic, and natural colors and decorations that were popular in the fall and winter, and start bringing is fresh, bright colors, a rainbow of floral decorations, and themes that celebrate life, love, and new beginnings as the world begins to bloom anew all around. At GOFF Tents and Events we’re ready for spring, so let’s party.

 

Bright, vibrant colors

Spring is in the air, and the colors are starting to change all around. We’re moving from golden, red, orange, and brown, and brightening up the color scheme for the spring-themed parties. Flowers are blooming, and you can get every color of the rainbow, and they are bold, bright, juicy, and vibrant.

 

Fresh flowers and fruit

Much like a gourmet meal, using fresh ingredients will elevate every party. The more you can take from nature to complete your decorations, the more beautiful and luxurious your party will be. Use fresh fruit and fresh flowers to create gorgeous centerpieces and decor for your party.

There’s nothing more beautiful than bright yellow, fresh, juicy lemons and limes in a bowl, or fresh apples, oranges, and berries. Use nature to guide your spring party decor.

 

Spring-themed linens and tableware

You don’t want to go overboard with the colors. Your spring-themed party should make you feel like you are trapped in a bowl of Jelly Bellies. Stick to a few natural decorations and use them strategically.

If you already have a lot of colors from flowers and fruit, stick to neutral linens, which will complement the rest of the decor but won’t overpower. White linens may seem too formal, so you can try linens that are soft, muted yellow, blue, or green that will accentuate your decor, but won’t make your party too chaotic with color.

Let one of our Wedding Planners and our new Floral Department at Goff Tents and Events usher you into spring in a colorful way.

Boozy Easter Eggs

Boozy Easter Eggs

Boozy Easter Eggs!!!!! My Grandmother’s birthday just happens to be April 1st, which happens to be April Fools fools day. Her favorite wine just happens to be Sutter Home, so last year I made her Boozy Easter Eggs and placed them in an Easter Basket. Figured it would be a gift that would sure make everyone giggle AND one my Grandmother would enjoy since she does love her wine!!!!

The Boozy Easter Eggs were such a hit with my family, that I decided this Easter season I would make the eggs for y’all over here on the blog!!!!

The plastic eggs can be found at Dollar Tree and you can purchase the mini Sutter Home bottles at any store that sells wine for ridiculously cheap. My local store even sells four packs for around $6! Perfect for an Easter gift for your besties or a Grandmother like mine who loves her wine!

Cheers & Happy Easter!

Boozy Easter Eggs

 

Supplies
• Large Plastic Easter Eggs (Dollar Tree)
• Easter Grass
• Jelly Beans
• Sutter Home Mini Wine Bottles

 

Boozy Easter Eggs

1. Fill each plastic Easter Egg with Easter grass.

 

Boozy Easter Eggs

2. Place your mini Sutter Home Wine bottles in the plastic Easter Eggs.

 

Boozy Easter Eggs

3. Sprinkle in a few jelly beans.

 

Boozy Easter Eggs

4. Close the plastic Easter Eggs.

 

Boozy Easter Eggs

5. Hand out to your besties!!! Happy Easter!!

7 Easy Steps to Pulling Off an Epic Easter Egg Hunt

7 Easy Steps to Pulling Off an Epic Easter Egg Hunt

Hosting an egg hunt this Easter? Here are the basics to planning a successful holiday hunt without breaking a sweat.

 

Ask any kid who’s been a part of one: Egg hunts are the best part of Easter celebrations. There’s candy, outdoor activity, colorful eggs, a little light-hearted competition, and, best of all, prizes. While you’re probably familiar with the modern Easter game of hiding hard-boiled eggs or plastic eggs filled with candy for kids to collect, versions of this particular Easter tradition appear to have been around for centuries. According to History.com, sources suggest the concept of the Easter bunny may initially derive from lore about an egg-laying hare, introduced in America by 18th century German settlers in Pennsylvania. Children would set out homemade nests, in which this ancestor of the Easter bunny could lay its pretty-colored eggs.

These days, it’s the perfect excuse to get outside for some springtime air and watch kids young and old search for hidden treasure. Thinking it’s time you stepped up to host the annual Easter hunt extravaganza? Or maybe you’re plotting a small-but-spirited at-home hunt for the little ones in your immediate family. Follow these easy steps for pulling off a classic Easter egg hunt like a pro.

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1. Set the Date
Of course it’s traditional to have an Easter egg hunt on Easter Day, but it’s certainly not required. In fact, you may be attending a few in the neighborhood, in addition to hosting your own, so realistically not all egg hunts can happen on the same day. An ideal timeframe would be Easter weekend, or even the week/end before. If you’re planning on hosting outdoors, have a back-up location plan in case of rain or chilly weather.

2. Pick a Location
Whether the hunt is taking place in your front yard or the grounds of the community center, make sure the location works for your group. Pick an area that’s large enough for your hunters, but not too large that it’s impossible to find the eggs. You’ll also want a spot where you can clearly define the boundaries, has plenty of grass, and is set far enough away from a road or pond. If you’re hosting inside, try and make sure the adventures take place on one floor so there are no stairs in the mix.

3. Stock Up on Eggs
Quite possibly the most important part of an Easter egg hunt. While some hosts prefer to hide real eggs, it’s often best to use plastic eggs, especially if there are a lot of little kids invited to your hunt (and bonus, you can fill each plastic egg with candy, knick-knacks, and even coins, if you’re feeling generous!). You’re also welcome to use a mix of both—the more eggs the merrier. If you’re not sure about how many to have on hand, we’d suggest about 10 eggs per child, depending on the age group.

4. Have Baskets, Buckets, and Pails at the Ready
You could host a BYOB (Bring Your Own Basket) Easter egg hunt—and it would be great if everyone showed up with baskets—but play it safe and assume you’ll need to have egg-collecting gear for all your hunt attendees. Plan to have at least one vessel for goodies for every guest invited. Easter baskets are always traditional, but tote bags, beach pails, or even cute small boxes are fun Easter basket alternatives.

5. Hide the Eggs
Before you start hiding anything, count the eggs. (You’ll thank yourself later.) Choose hiding spots that make sense for the ages of the kids invited. You’ll want some eggs in more obvious locations (right on the open lawn), and others hidden in more challenging spots like tucked inside a mailbox, in a plant bed, or hidden behind the stump of a tree.

6. Ready, Set, Hunt
If you’re hosting many kids of all different ages, think about letting kids start in rounds by age group or range. To be fair, let the the littlest hunters have first dibs on eggs. Once they go, start a countdown of a minute to 30 seconds (any longer and you’ll probably make some enemies) before giving the older age groups the go-ahead to join in.

7. Count the Eggs
When you’re certain that all the eggs have been found (this is where counting them before hiding them comes in handy), it’s time to make the final tally. Sometimes even the egg hiders forget about those clever hiding spots. If you choose to reward the all-star gatherers—beyond the goodies inside their bounty of plastic eggs—now’s the time to offer up festive Easter prizes.