Hawaii has the highest number of multigenerational households in America, with just shy of 40,000 homes accommodating three or more generations. Living with parents and grandparents may seem like a daunting prospect to many and perhaps not a very appealing one. However, just as exercising together across generations has huge benefits for our physical and emotional well being, there are several positive aspects to multigenerational living that are worth taking into consideration.

It can save you money

Studies show that multi-generational living reduces the cost of living, thanks to the different generations sharing daily household resources. The cost-effective nature of multigenerational living also means that families have the potential to live in an area that may not have been financially viable otherwise. Alternatively, you may find you can afford to live in a larger house. Just be sure to factor in the key financial aspects involved before committing to a new family home.

Living with other generations can strengthen family bonds

Arguably one of the most important benefits of multigenerational living is the close relationships that can be forged across generations. Research by the Oxford University has shown that grandparents play a pivotal role in children’s welfare, particularly when they are involved in their lives from early on. By living together, grandparents and grandchildren can have a mutually positive impact on each other’s lives: the former acting as role models and providing love and support, with the latter often providing grandparents with some purpose, stimulation and joy.

Improves the security of your home

Another important benefit of multigenerational living is the increased safety at home. Statistically, burglars are most likely to break into unoccupied homes. With multiple people living under the same roof, it is likely that someone will be in the majority of the time. As a result, your home is less likely to be burglarized. Incidentally, it can also be helpful to have a reasonably large resident dog, as these act as good deterrents to intruders.

Multigenerational living is multi-beneficial

While living with your parents and/or grandparents may not seem ideal at first, there are in fact many reasons to see it as a positive, even preferable, setup. The practical upshots are certainly worthwhile, from financial savings, home security and even babysitting. The potential for long-lasting, meaningful bonds to be made between different generations, however, is particularly powerful, and make multi-generational living something that people should not necessarily shy away from.