If I’ve learned anything from the recent recent lock downs due to the deadly virus it’s to make family meals using whatever is on hand.

For many of us lock downs are soon to be a thing of the past if your state hasn’t reopened already.  But the treat of more lock downs may still loom in our future.  Such is our new normal, at least until a vaccine or a cure can be found.  In my opinion that’s a big reason to not forget the lessons we learned thus far.

I’m fortunate enough to live in Hawaii, a state which hasn’t seen the devastation COVID-19 has wielded across the other 48 states that we refer to as the mainland.  I’m not sure if it was our politicians’ prompt stay at home order which began on March 23, our health department’s mandatory 14 day quarantine of incoming travelers, our small population with less high density areas, or our isolated location which kept us from the widespread suffering experienced by the other states.  I’m prone to think it was a combination of all these factors.  But whatever the case maybe the virus was no more real or frightening for us on the islands as it was for our fellow citizens on the mainland.

Our fears heightened by 24/7 news reports and social media posts spurred many citizens to stand in long lines in search of toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and disinfectants just like our mainland counter parts.  Fortunately for our family we didn’t wait in long lines searching for basic necessities.  My daughter whose family lives in Northern Italy had been in lock down since February, she had urged us to stock up on food and other necessities weeks before US cases and deaths piled up.  She had warned that it was only a matter of time before we faced the same issues they faced in Europe.  Luckily we listened.  We had shopped in early March, doubling and sometimes tripling what we normally purchased.  Another plus was having an extra freezer and pantry.

Before the lock down began and we were stocking up our homes and kitchens we had decided that the plan was to have enough of everything so that during the lock down we just had to replenish a few things such as fresh fruits and veggies. During the lock down we’d have lists of what we ran out of which made our grocery trips faster and more efficient; we’d also wait until the list was pretty long before heading to the store.

Because we shopped less frequently and when we did shop not everything on the list was always available, we did run short of a few things.  Which is why some of our favorite dishes had to be altered to make use of what we had on hand.

One of the easiest dishes to adapt to ingredients you have on hand is stew.  I never really had to plan on making stew, I’ve pretty much use ingredients I found in my fridge and pantry.  And in a pandemic stews are one of the best comfort foods to serve.

So during the lock down I made Hunters’ Stew.  I call it that because I basically “hunt” for ingredients in my kitchen and toss them together to make my stew.  So here’s my hunters’ stew “recipe”, feel free to substitute ingredients based on your tastes and what’s on hand.

Ingredients:

Meat – beef, chicken, lamb, or no meat at all – cut meat into large chunks

Veggies – any combination of veggies such as potatoes, carrots, celery, okra, etc.

Flour for dredging

Salt & Pepper

2 Tbs. Oil

Garlic – fresh or powder

Oregano, basil, thyme, bay leaf, or Italian seasoning

Stock or broth – use the same broth as your meat – if you’re making beef stew then use beef broth, etc.

2 Cans tomato sauce or crushed tomatoes (you can even use tomato paste if that’s all you have – if you use paste you may have to use more liquid)

Directions:

Heat oil in a large pot.

Mix salt, pepper, flour together.

Coat meat in flour mixture, shake off excess flour and place in pot.

Cook until all sides of meat are browned.

Add garlic and other spices.

Add broth and veggies and stir well.

Lower heat to simmer.

Cook covered until potatoes are cooked.

Add tomato sauce or crushed tomatoes.

Cover and simmer until meat is tender.

Serve hot.

Store leftovers in the fridge.

Reheated left over stew is usually tastier than fresh stew!


Hunter's Beef Stew
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Hunter's Beef Stew
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