Gardens are an excellent resource for families that can be used for many things, from providing food to bringing the family itself together. However, when you’re planning the design of the garden and what you’ll plant in it, you’ll want to pay special attention to including every family member in the functionality of the final design. In this article, we’ll teach you how to do just that.

Interactive Structures

If you’re designing your garden from scratch, you’ll probably want to consider adding some kinds of structures to it in the process, whether this structure ends up being a shed, a swing-set for the kids, or a deck of some sort. However, keep in mind that, if you plan to live in the home for many years, these buildings need to do double-duty. If you want to install a swing-set or jungle-gym, what will you put there when the kids grow too big for it? Can you add a slide to the side of the deck to help the kids enjoy it more? Maybe you can even add a water feature to the yard that an elderly parent or relative might enjoy.

Family-Friendly Plants

When planting your garden, you’ll want to be extra careful about what you plant in it if you plan to share it with the family. Certain types of plants (even common garden flowers!) can be toxic to children or pets. You should do some research into these plants before you plant anything, or you can request the help of an expert who knows more about them. Common picks like foxglove, morning glory and wild black cherry are all toxic to children and pets. These plants and others should be avoided in family gardens, and if you have some growing there already, you should think about disposing of them. You’ll also want to make sure that the plants you opt for don’t obstruct or clog up your gutters. In other words, to avoid water damage, regularly check that your gutters are well-maintained and clean.

Include All Ages

When you’re planting your garden, make sure to ask the opinions of all family members on what should be planted in different areas of the garden. If you plan to have a vegetable area in the garden, for example, let kids and other family members pick one or more vegetables to plant there that will be their responsibility to take care of. Not only does this include them, but it also teaches them responsibility and takes some of the weight of maintenance off your shoulders. You can apply this to flowers, fruit trees, and herbs, too.