How stressed are you from 1 to 10? If you’re tempted to answer “11”, chances are you are not the only one. Most of us have to juggle huge amounts of stress on a daily basis. In fact, we are so used to stress that we can’t even imagine a world without it. It has become an integral part of our everyday lifestyle. As a result, high stress has been normalized. Everybody has developed a few coping mechanisms, from tuning in to your favorite relaxing app – headspace is an excellent space to start your meditative journey, for instance – to signing up to your local gym for a quick spin on the bike after a long day at the office.

However, while stress management strategies tend to ignore the primary issues. The human body is not designed to handle large amounts of unnecessary pressures. While your coping mechanisms can help you to make do in the short term, they don’t remove stress from your day-to-day life. When high pressure becomes an everyday practice, it’s time to consider making some changes to actively reduce stress – such as switching careers. Indeed, high-stress can trigger life-altering conditions for which there is no cure, such as:

Tinnitus causes hearing disruptions
Tinnitus happens when your brain thinks you are hearing sounds that are not here. Unlike an audio hallucination, tinnitus can present itself as a constant ringing, buzzing, or even clicking that can drown the real-life sounds around you. Chronic stress is one of the major triggers for tinnitus. Unfortunately, practicing meditation is unlikely to heal you. However, though there’s no cure for tinnitus, there’s treatment for it that can help you to regain your hearing functions. Prolonged tinnitus can, indeed, accentuate the risks of hearing impairment and isolation. In some cases, long-term stress release can have seen to improve the symptoms of tinnitus; however, it’s not a guaranteed solution.

Addison’s disease leads to drastic weight loss
For anyone who is trying to get in better shape and shed a few pounds, the prospect of a condition that makes you lose weight is appealing. However, don’t assume that it’s easy. Addison’s disease is caused by a low volume of cortisol hormone in your system. Your adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient cortisol. Cortisol, known as the stress hormone, is produced as a response to an anxiety-inducing event. However, chronic stress puts a lot of pressure on your adrenal glands, which can lead to irreparable damage, resulting in Addison’s disease. Living with the disease is challenging as patients struggle to maintain a healthy weight, blood pressure, and muscle strength.

Alzheimer’s disease makes you forget those you love
Patients with Alzheimer’s are often unable to recognize their relatives. While the degenerative condition is progressive – in other words, you don’t lose your memories overnight – it is a terrifying prospect for patients who can feel themselves forgetting their past. According to studies, high levels of stress have been linked to dementia. Scientists believe that stress is not a consequence of Alzheimer’s disease, but one of its most important triggers.

In conclusion, stress is not only unpleasant, but it is also highly dangerous. Indeed, it can cause debilitating conditions that are likely to transform your life forever. Perhaps it is time to take back control and actively target stress areas in your life before they affect your health.